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Traditional Resources

           Grade Nine Social Studies

SASKATCHEWAN WESTERN DEVELOPMENT MUSEUM
 
 
 Lesson Plan - Traditional Resources (PDF)

 

Traditional Resources Webquest

Students will engage in a webquest activity to explore issues surrounding Aboriginal people and natural resources in today's society.  Students can carry out the activity individually or in small research groups.  The webquest introduces the topic, outlines the task, lists pertinent resources and explains the process. 

 

Introduction:

You are a foreign reporter writing an article about a proposal to build a major new industrial development in Saskatchewan's northern boreal forest.  Local elders and Aboriginal community members have expressed concern about how this development could impact the environment, and consequently, affect hunting, trapping and fishing in the area.  You will be interviewing both Aboriginals from the surrounding community and officials from the company proposing the development in the coming week.  You don't have much background knowledge about the local Aboriginal community and their history, so you decide to conduct some background information beforehand.    

 

The Task:

In this webquest you will find answers to ten questions by visiting a series of provided web links and references listed under Resources.  You may also consult your school or local library to locate your answers.  You will gain sufficient background knowledge to competently conduct your interview with local Aboriginal representatives by gaining an understanding of issues surrounding their rights to to hunt, fish and trap. 

 

The Process:

1.  Either individually or as part of a small group, according to your teacher's preference, answer the following questions by reviewing the references listed below under Resources.

  • What is the definition of Aboriginal Rights? 

  • What is the definition of Aboriginal Title?

  • Are Aboriginal Rights and Treaty Rights the same thing?

  • Read through the text of one of the numbered Treaties in Saskatchewan available on the Indian and Northern Affairs Canada website.  What does the text of the Treaty say about Aboriginal hunting and fishing rights?  

  • When First Nations and the Crown entered into the numbered Treaties, First Nations believed they were entering into a land-sharing agreement between sovereign nations, enabling settlement to proceed.  They planned to share the land with the newcomers "to the depth of a plough." The Crown believed that the First Nations were extinguishing their rights to the land by signing the agreements.  How does this difference in interpretation continue to affect how Aboriginals are allowed to practice elements of a traditional lifestyle? 

  • What priority ranks above Aboriginal Rights in the management of natural resources? 

  • Are Aboriginal hunting rights applicable to hunting and fishing for sustenance, commercial purposes or both? 

  • On what lands are Aboriginal people able to hunt, trap and fish without a license?  Under what circumstances do they need a license?

  • Do Métis in Saskatchewan have the same hunting and fishing rights? 

  • Why are hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering still important to Aboriginals in modern day society? 

Resources:

The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

Online articles available at http://www.esask.ca

" Aboriginal Hunting Rights," "Aboriginal Fishing Rights" and "Aboriginal Treaty Rights" by Brock Pitawanakwat

"Traditional Ecological Knowledge" by Herman Michell

"Métis and Non-Status Indian Legal Issues" by Darren R. Prefontaine

 

Historic Treaty Information Site - Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/pr/trts/hti/site/maindex_e.html

 

Words First: An Evolving Terminology Relating to Aboriginal Peoples in Canada - Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/pr/pub/wf/index_e.html

 

First Nations and Métis Relations - Government of Saskatchewan

http://www.fnmr.gov.sk.ca/

 

Guide to Métis Hunting and Fishing Rights in Saskatchewan (PDF, Saskatchewan Environment)

 

Northern Research Portal - "Wildlife Management in Canada," by Anne Mease:

http://scaa.usask.ca/gallery/northern/content?pg=ex12-2
 

"Indian Hunting Rights in Saskatchewan" by Patrick Wallace (Saskatchewan Indian.  January 1990, p.10.)

http://www.sicc.sk.ca/saskindian/a90jan10.htm
 

"Métis Rights" on the Métis Nation - Saskatchewan website:
http://www.metisnation-sask.com/rights/
 

The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities, Unit Four, Hunting and Trapping - Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/ks/pdf/e_guide3.pdf

 

Cardinal, Harold and Walter Hildebrandt. Treaty Elders of Saskatchewan: Our Dream is That Our Peoples Will One Day Be Clearly Recognized as Nations. Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2000.

 

Articles prepared by the Office of the Treaty Commissioner

"Treaty Backgrounder"

"Modern Day Treaties and Agreements"

"Aboriginal Rights and Title"

 

 

                 

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